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FAQ | Frequently Asked Questions

Why should I choose ElectroMagneticWorks Inc. for my electromagnetic simulations?

• ElectroMagneticWorks Inc. is the only company that provides electromagnetic Add-in to Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor.
• Both EMS and HFWorks are Gold Certified by Solidworks Corporation.
• SolidWorks Gold Certification guarantees you the highest level of integration in Solidworks and compliance with SolidWorks integration standards.
• Best Value/Price ratio.
• Build real models ready for manufacturing.
• Together, EMS and HFWorks cover a wide frequency range, i.e. from DC to 200 GHz.
• Multi-configuration multi-study procedure on the fly.
• Changes to the model design do not entail the construction of a new structure.
• Focus on design not CAD.
• Use the easiest to learn CAD environment.
• Considerably shortened model building times.
• Share models across departments/disciplines.
• Use design tables, parameterization and multi-configurations for design of experiment studies, investigating design alternatives and for optimization .
• Access a multi-physics-ready platform: perform electromagnetic, thermal, stress, vibration, fluid-flow, etc. analyses on the same model all inside SolidWorks by combining HFWorks, EMS and SolidWorks Simulation.
• Use SolidWorks' import capabilities to import CAD models from virtually any other CAD product.
• Robust automatic meshing and mesh controls give full control over meshing for one pass solution .
• Drag and drop functionality within a single study and between studies to duplicate material properties and boundary conditions.
• Cloning of studies allows you to inherit material properties, boundary conditions, meshing and results – change only the parameters you need in the cloned study and re-simulate in no time.
• Study report viewing inside Solidworks.
• A built-in automated report generator with built-in report viewers that makes documenting your work extremely easy.
• Run Thermal, Structural and Motion coupled analysis

What is the price of EMS and HFWorks?

• Unfortunately, we cannot give prices on our web site.
• Rest assured that we have the best Value/Price ratio.
• Please contact us for price information.

How can I purchase your products?

• Contact us directly, or
• Contact our reseller in your area. Please refer to our Resellers section in our website to find the closest reseller to your area.

Which operating systems do you support?

All our products run only on Windows operating system, i.e. Windows Vista, and Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows 10. Unix operating system is not supported.

What is a study?

A study is design scenario. It has an analysis type, e.g. EMS/Magnetostatic or HFWorks/Antennas; study properties, e.g. name, frequency, matrix solver type, etc.; material properties, boundary conditions and excitations and a mesh. Once solved, a study will also have a set of corresponding results and a log file.

What is the recommended system requirement to run EMS?

• Windows 64-bit.
• 6 GB of RAM or more.
• 50 GB of free hard disk space.

What is the recommended system requirement to run HFWorks?

• Windows 64-bit.
• 8 GB of RAM or more.
• 100 GB of Free Hard Disk space.

Do your products work on 32 bit system?

No. But because of inherited Windows limitation on memory, only small problems may be simulated in 32 bit system.

Do I need Solidworks or Autodesk Inventor to run your software?

Yes.

I do not have Solidworks or Autodesk Inventor. Do I need to purchase it separately? or does the software come with it?

No, the software does not come with Solidworks nor Autodesk Inventor. To purchase a license of Solidworks or Autodesk Inventor, please contact your local Solidworks or Autodesk Reseller.

Are both EMS and HFWorks Gold Certified by SolidWorks Corporation?

Yes.

Can I import from another CAD system?

Yes. Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor have excellent CAD importing capabilities.

What is the difference between EMS and HFWorks?

EMS is for low to medium frequencies, i.e. DC-500 MHz, applications such as motors, transformers, solenoids, magnets, etc. HFWorks for medium to high frequencies, i.e. 100 MHz-200 GHz, applications such as antennas, connectors, filters, etc.

Up to what frequency can I use EMS? how about HFWorks?

EMS is typically used for DC to about 500 MHz. HFWorks is generally used for frequencies ranging from few hundred MHz to around 200 GHz. There are overlapping frequencies between EMS and HFWorks. Please contact us to discuss your needs and which product is more suitable for your application.

How about the compatibility of your products with Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor versions?

• EMS & HFWorks versions are forward compatible with Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor for 1 version ahead, e.g., EMS 2016 will be compatible with SolidWorks 2017 and Autodesk Inventor 2017. But, it will not be compatible with 2018 versions.
• EMS & HFWorks versions are not backward compatible with Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor, e.g., EMS 2016 is not compatible with Solidworks 2015 and Autodesk Inventor 2015.
To work on previous versions of Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor, you will need a previous versions of EMS or HFWorks.

Do you offer training classes?

Yes.

Do you have resellers outside USA and Canada?

Yes. All SolidWorks resellers worldwide are authorized to sell our products.

Do you offer consulting services?

Yes.

How much do you charge per hour of consulting?

• Unfortunately, we cannot give prices on our web site.
• Rest assured that we have the best Value/Price ratio.
• Please contact us for price information.

Do you give discounts to academic institutions?

Yes. We give a generous discount to universities in the USA and Canada. However, it is on a case per case basis for universities in other regions.

What kind of devices can I model using EMS?

Electromechanical, electromagnetic, and power electronics devices can readily be studied using EMS. Electromagnetic behaviour could also be investigated with EMS. Below is sample list of devices and applications classified by areas:

Electromechanical
• Motors and generators
• Linear and rotational actuators
• Relays
• MEMS
• Magnetic recording heads
• Magnetic levitation
• Solenoids
• Loud speakers
• Electromagnetic Brakes and Clutches
• Alternators
• Magnetic bearings

Electromagnetic
• Coils
• Permanent magnets
• Sensors
• NDT, NDE
• High power
• High voltage
• PCBs
• MRI Magnets
• Induction heating
• Bushings
• Switchgear
• Cables

Power electronics
• Transformers
• Inverters
• Converters
• Bus bars
• Inductors

Electromagnetic behaviour
• Insulation studies
• Electrostatic discharge
• Electromagnetic shielding
• EMI/EMC
• Electromagnetic exposure

What kind of devices can I model using HFWorks?

All passive components can readily be studied using HFWorks. Below is just a sample list of devices and applications classified by areas:

RF& Microwave
• Antennas
• Connectors
• Filters
• Resonators
• Couplers
• Frequency-selective surfaces
• Band-gap (EBG) structures and meta-materials
• RF coils for MRI

EDA/Electronics
• Signal integrity
• Power integrity
• PCBs and IC Packages
• Chip-Package-Board systems

EMI/EMC
• All EMI/EMC structures
• Simultaneous switch noise (SSN)
• Simultaneous switching output (SSO)
• EM field exposure

In which industries do you products find applications?

Electromagnetics is an enabling technology. Many industries make use of electromagnetics in one form or another. The following is a generalized list of such industries:

• High Tech / Electronics
• Energy and Process
• Automotive and Transportation
• Aerospace and Defense
• Consumer goods
• Life Sciences

What numerical method are EMS and HFWorks based on?

Both EMS and HFWorks are based on the powerful and universal finite element method.

Do you offer customized development services?

Yes.

Do you give free evaluation copy of your software?

Yes. But it is on a case per case basis.

Do you run benchmark examples?

Yes. But it is on a case per case basis.

Can you comment on your competitors?

We shall not. We can only talk about our products.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that EMS/Electrostatic module can address?

The Electrostatic module can help study a large number of devices and address numerous insulating and conducting phenomena. Below is just a partial list:

• Avoid rapid reduction in the resistance of an electrical insulator, that can lead to a spark jumping around or through the insulator, i.e. dielectric breakdown. This phenomenon is common in high voltage and high power applications.
• Avoid the ionization of a fluid surrounding a conductor, i.e. corona effect, in some applications such as power transmission equipments, transformers, capacitors, electric motors and generators.
• Produce corona in some other applications such as the manufacturing of ozone, scrubbing particles from air in applications such as air-conditioning systems, in nitrogen laser, when removing the unwanted electric charges from the surface of aircraft in flight, and in electrostatic copying.
• Assure that a high voltage machine is properly grounded.
• Reduce the electrostatic discharge in PCB and electronic designs.
• Assure the proper actuation force in MEMS and RF-MEMS designs.
• Avoid cross talk and distortion in electronic devices.
• Assure that a charged particle follows a desired trajectory.
• Compute the capacitance matrix, i.e. self capacitance and mutual capacitance, for high-speed electronic circuits and interconnects.
• Compute the electric field, electric flux, and voltage in insulators and around conductors.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that EMS/Magnetostatic module can address?

The Magnetostatic module can help study a large number of devices and address numerous magnetic and electromechanical phenomena. Below is just a partial list:

• Avoid saturation in magnetic devices. Magnetic saturation is a limitation occurring in ferromagnetic cores. Initially, as current is increased the flux increases in proportion to it. At some point, however, further increases in current lead to progressively smaller increases in flux. Eventually, the core can make no further contribution to flux growth and any increase thereafter is limited to that provided by air - perhaps three orders of magnitude smaller.
• Minimize the cogging torque. The cogging torque of electrical motors is the torque due to the interaction between the permanent magnets and the stator slots of a Permanent Magnet (PM) machine. Also termed as detent or 'no-current' torque, it is an undesirable component for the operation of such a motor. It is especially prominent at lower speeds, with the symptom of jerkiness.
• Lower cost and weight of magnetic devices by trimming excess material from ferromagnetic cores.
• Optimize magnetic and ferromagnetic circuits.
• Optimize coil winding and electromagnets.
• Optimize permanent magnet machines by studying the trade-off between samarium-cobalt, Neodymium-iron-born, ceramic, and Alnico magnets.
• Study the trade-off between soft magnetic and hard magnetic materials in terms of magnetization and demagnetization.
• Study the effect of B-H curves or magnetization curves on the performance of magnetic devices and circuits.
• Optimize the torque in motors while maintaining the driving current to a minimum.
• Avoid sparking and thus minimizing brush wear and electric noise in motors, solenoids, actuators, and other electromechanical devices.
• Optimize the force for linear solenoids and the torque for rotary solenoids without overheating the winding.
• Assure the proper Lorentz force in a speaker voice coil.
• Evaluate complex coil structures.
• Evaluate a multitude of permanent magnet configurations.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that EMS/Electric Conduction module can address?

The Electric Conduction module can help study a large number of devices and address numerous conducting and joule effects. Below is just a partial list:

• Protect electric and electronics equipment from over current by designing the appropriate fuse.
• Protect electric and electronics equipment from over voltage condition by designing the appropriate crowbar circuit that uses both fuses and shunts.
• Measure the current flowing though an electric circuit by designing the appropriate shunt.
• Assure the proper current flow in solar cells.
• Identify weak spots in electric and electronic circuits.
• Assure the proper amount of current flow in medical and biomedical devices.
• Avoid over-heating and melting any current carrying devices.
• Approximate heating and hardening penetrations in industrial applications.
• Assure the proper plating and anodizing in electro-chemical applications.
• Compute the resistance of arbitrary shaped conductors.
• Compute the electric current density in arbitrary shaped conductor.
• Evaluate the electric field strength and voltage distribution.
• Compute the temperature, temperature gradient, and heat flux due to Joule heating.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that EMS/AC Magnetic module can address?

The AC Magnetic module can help study a large number of devices and address numerous magnetic and eddy current effects. Below is just a partial list:

• Minimize eddy current losses and preserve efficiency of many devices that use changing magnetic fields such as iron core transformers and alternating current motors such synchronous motors, 3-phase Induction motors, single phase induction motors, switched reluctance motors, and synchronous generators.
• Optimize the Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) equipment to better detect cracks and flaws in metallic parts. This technology is typically used in pipe inspection for the oil and gas industries. The aerospace industry also makes use of the NDT and NDE technologies.
• Optimize the coils design of metal detector to better detect metallic objects such mines, weapons, treasures, etc.
• Minimize the flux leakage and leakage inductance in transformers.
• Make sure that heat generated by the power transformer is within the regulatory bodies’ requirements.
• Minimize the skin effect in solid coils.
• Optimize the force for linear solenoids and the torque for rotary solenoids without overheating the winding.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that EMS/Transient Magnetic module can address?

The Transient Magnetic module can help study a large number of devices and address numerous magnetic, eddy current, and transient effects. Below is just a partial list:

• Take into account both eddy current and saturation in devices that use time varying magnetic fields such as loudspeakers and induction machines.
• Optimize the Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) sensors to detect deep flaws and cracks.
• Study time varying devices such as magnetic heads, pulsed power transformers, and electromagnetic launchers.
• Study the response of pulsed power electronic equipment after a power failure or switch off.
• Design inductive heating devices.
• Calculate the motion of loudspeaker voice coils.
• Study the switch on/off modes, failures, AC excitation of devices with non-linear magnetic materials.
• Calculate the motion of electromechanical devices such as motors, generators, actuators, magnetic levitation, etc.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that HFWorks/Resonance module can address?

The Resonance module can help study a large number of RF & microwave devices and address numerous resonance and loss effects. Below is just a partial list:

• Design a resonator around a specific resonant frequency.
• Predict dielectric breakdown in a dielectric resonator and avoid it.
• Compute conductor and dielectric quality factors separately.
• Account for both conductivity and surface roughness of a conductor wall.
• Design high Q structures.
• Properly dimension the resonators in of multi-pole filters and optimize pole-zero placement.
• Adjust circuit housing to push resonances out the operational band and have a resonance-free structure.
• Compute the specific absorption rate (SAR) in microwave heating applications.
• Predict if a given design will resonate and locate resonance areas.
• Study the effect of material and dimension on the resonant frequency and the field distribution.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that HFWorks/S-parameters module can address?

The S-parameters module can help study a large number of RF & microwave devices and address numerous dispersion and matching effects. Below is just a partial list:

• Obtain the vector frequency response of arbitrary 3D circuit/structure.
• Examine the TDR of a structure.
• Design around a resonance.
• Distinguish between common and differential modes.
• Achieve a good matching over a frequency range.
• Study the frequency response of a structure.
• Account for both dielectric and conductor losses.
• Study the fidelity of a high frequency structure.
• Achieve or avoid a mode conversion.
• Study the signal integrity of a structure.
• Examine both propagating and evanescent modes.
• Examine both fundamental and higher order modes.
• Optimize pole-zero placement of a filter.
• Study the effect of material and dimension on the circuit and field parameters.

Can you give me some examples of design issues that HFWorks/Antennas module can address?

The Antennas module can help study a large number of antenna structures and address numerous far-field and near-field effects. Below is just a partial list:

•Obtain the vector frequency response of an arbitrary 3D antenna structures.
•Obtain the radiation pattern of an antenna over a frequency range.
•Compute the resonant frequency of an antenna.
•Eliminate the reactance of an antenna.
•Maximize the ratio of the radiation resistance to ohmic resistance of an antenna.
•Achieve a good matching over a frequency range.
•Respect the power rating of a transmitting antenna to avoid sparking and arcing.
•Optimize the noise rejection of a receiving antenna.
•Study the effect of radomes on the antenna parameters.
•Obtain all antenna parameters including gain, directivity, efficiency, axial ratio, input impedance, radiation resistance, etc.
•Account for both dielectric and conductor losses.
•Study the fidelity of an antenna.
•Minimize the side lobes.
•Study the EMI/EMC of a structure.
•Study the effect of material and dimension on the antenna and field parameters.
•Study the effect of the environment on the antenna performance, especially the ground.
•Design efficient radomes to protect and hide the antenna.
•Design radar absorbing materials (RAM).

What design parameter results can I get out of HFWorks/Resonance module?

The Resonance module outputs the following results for each study:

• Resonant frequencies,i.e. Eigen modes
• Dielectric quality factor
• Conductor quality factor
• Overall quality factor
• Electric field distribution
• Magnetic field distribution
• Specific absorption rate distribution

What design parameter results can I get out of HFWorks/S-parameters module?

The S-parameters module outputs the following results for each study at each frequency:

• Generalized S-parameters matrix
• Re-normalized S-parameters matrix
• Unique impedance matrix
• Unique admittance matrix
• TDR
• VSWR
• Propagation parameters at each port
• Impedances at each port
• Electric field distribution
• Magnetic field distribution
• Specific absorption rate distribution

What design parameter results can I get out of HFWorks/Antennas module?

The Antennas module outputs the following results for each study at each frequency:

• All antenna parameters including gain, directivity, efficiency, axial ratio, input impedance, etc
• Far field parameters including radiation patterns
• Generalized S-parameters matrix
• Re-normalized S-parameters matrix
• Unique impedance matrix
• Unique admittance matrix
• TDR
• VSWR
• Propagation parameters at each port
• Impedances at each port
• Electric near field distribution
• Magnetic near field distribution

What design parameter results can I get out of EMS/Electrostatic module?

The Electrostatic module outputs the following results for each study:

• Electrostatic potential
• Electric field
• Electric flux density
• Capacitance matrix
• Force
• Torque
• Stored energy
• Temperature
• Temperature gradient
• Heat flux

What design parameter results can I get out of EMS/Magnetostatic module?

The Magnetostatic module outputs the following results for each study:

• Magnetic field
• Magnetic flux density
• Current density
• Force density
• Inductance matrix
• Flux linkage
• Resistance
• Force
• Torque
• Stored energy
• Temperature
• Temperature gradient
• Heat flux

What design parameter results can I get out of EMS/Electric Conduction module?

The Electric Conduction module outputs the following results for each study:

• Electrostatic potential
• Electric field
• Current density
• Resistance
• Dissipated power
• Temperature
• Temperature gradient
• Heat flux

What design parameter results can I get out of EMS/AC Magnetic module?

The AC Magnetic module outputs the following results for each study:

• Magnetic field
• Magnetic flux density
• Current density
• Eddy current
• Force density
• Inductance matrix
• Flux linkage
• Resistance
• Impedance
• Core loss
• Eddy loss
• Hysteresis loss
• Ohmic loss
• Current
• Voltage
• Force
• Torque
• Stored energy
• Temperature
• Temperature gradient
• Heat flux

What design parameter results can I get out of EMS/Transient Magnetic module?

The Transient Magnetic module outputs the following results for each study at each time step:

• Magnetic field
• Magnetic flux density
• Current density
• Eddy current
• Force density
• Inductance matrix
• Flux linkage
• Impedance
• Ohmic loss
• Current
• Voltage
• Force
• Torque
• Stored energy
• Temperature
• Temperature gradient
• Heat flux

I have never used SolidWorks. Is it easy to learn?

SolidWorks is the #1 3D CAD package. It is extremely easy to learn. We will be glad to give you a head start.

Can I do batch processing?

Yes.

Is it possible to carry out a Design of Experiment study?

Yes.

Do you have a material database with EMS HFWorks?

Yes. Both products come with standard built-in libraries with the most common materials, including insulators, conductors, permanent magnets, isotropic, orthotropic, nonlinear, lossy, etc. Users can add their own materials on the fly. User's materials can be organized in a single or multiple libraries.

Can I simulate lossy conductors in HFWorks?

Yes. In addition to conductivity, you may define a surface roughness of the conductor.

For a wide frequency band, do I need to simulate at each frequency point using HFWorks?

No. Simulating at discrete frequency point may take a long computational time. For faster simulation time, you should use HFWorks's Fast Frequency Sweep (FFS) feature.

How do I document my work using EMS or HFWorks?

No need for screen captures, cutting and pasting, or switching between applications. Both EMS and HFWorks come standard with report generator and viewers. Report generation automatically captures all figures, input and output data into an html and/or Word documents. The reports can be viewed, edited, or printed directly from the SolidWorks application interface. The generated report can readily be shared with others.

I accidently changed my SolidWorks model, what happens to my results?

To protect your work from accidental changes, we recommend that use the Study Locking feature in both EMS and HFWorks. A locked study may be viewed but cannot be edited or changed. Of course, you can always unlock the study if you need to make changes.

I need to make a minor change to my study, do I need to redo things from scratch?

No. You simply clone the original study, i.e. make a copy of it, and make the necessary changes in the cloned study. A cloned study inherits all features of the original study, i.e. study properties, materials, boundary conditions, excitations, mesh, etc.

What analysis options are there in HFWorks?

• Resonance
• S-parameters
• Antennas

What analysis options are there in EMS?

• Electrostatic
• Electric Conduction
• Magnetostatic
• AC Magnetic
• Transient Magnetic
• Thermal

What is Low/High Frequency Electromagnetics?

There are two major sub-domains in electromagnetics: low-frequency and high-frequency domains. Both domains are governed by Maxwell's equations.

The low-frequency domain includes the major part of the electromagnetic devices such as bushing, insulators, circuit breakers, power generators, transformers, electric motors, capacitors, magnetic levitation devices, synchronous machines, DC machines, permanent magnet motors, actuators, solenoids, etc.

Strictly speaking, any application in which displacement currents are negligible can be classified as low-frequency. The absence of the displacement currents de-couples the electric and magnetic fields and the situation becomes static.

The high-frequency domain includes the study of electromagnetic waves and propagation of energy through matter. It may be some times difficult to distinguish between high-frequency and low frequency. Nevertheless, we can generally say that electromagnetic fields in which the displacement currents cannot be neglected belong to the high-frequency domain. The displacement currents couple the electric and magnetic fields to each other and the situation becomes fully dynamic. Examples of devices that use high-frequency include antennas, waveguides, transmission lines, filters, couplers, dielectric resonators, etc.

What is Electrostatic Analysis? And what is used for?

Electrostatic is the branch of science that deals with the phenomena arising from stationary and/or slow-moving electric charges. Electrostatic approximation rests on the assumption that the electric field is irrotational, i.e. the curl of the electric field is null. From Faraday's law, this assumption implies the absence or near-absence of time-varying magnetic fields, i.e. the derivative of the magnetic field with respect to time is also null. In other words, electrostatics does not require the absence of magnetic fields or electric currents. Rather, if magnetic fields or electric currents do exist, they must not change with time, or in the worst-case, they must change with time only very slowly. In some problems, both electrostatics and magnetostatics may be required for accurate predictions, but the coupling between the two can still be ignored.

The EMS/Electrostatic module is primarily used for computing electric potential and electric field due to charges and voltages in insulators and conductors.It has many practical applications, including:

• High Voltage Components
• Insulating Systems
• EMC Compatibility
• Bus Bars
• MEMS
• Shielding
• Cables
• Switchgear
• Transformers
• Electronic tubes
• Capacitors
• Transmission Lines

What is Electric Conduction Analysis? And what is used for?

Electric Conduction is, in essence, based on the electrostatic approximation. Unlike the Electrostatic analysis which deals with insulators and electric conductors, the Electric Conduction deals with only conducting media which can sustain a current flow.

The EMS/ Electric Conduction module is primarily used for computing current flow in conductors due voltage differences. . It has many practical applications, including:

• Resistors
• Thin films
• Fuses
• Bus Bars
• Cables
• Shunts
• Solar cells
• Electronic circuits
• Biological medium
• Hardening
• Anodizing

What is Magnetostatic Analysis? And what is used for?

Magnetostatics is the study of static magnetic fields. In electrostatics, the charges are stationary, whereas here, the currents are steady or dc(direct current). As it turns out magnetostatics is a good approximation even when the currents are not static as long as the currents do not alternate rapidly. Furthermore, Maxwell's displacement current that couples the electric and magnetic fields is assumed to be null.

In EMS/ Magnetostatic analysis, the Gauss's law for magnetism, i.e. divergence of magnetic flux density is null, and Ampère's law, i.e. the curl of the magnetic field is equal to the static electric current density, are invoked to compute the magnetic field and its related quantities due to electric currents and permanent magnets. It has many practical applications, including:

• Motors and generators
• Linear and rotational actuators
• Relays
• MEMS
• Magnetic recording heads
• Magnetic levitation
• Solenoids
• Loud speakers
• Electromagnetic Brakes and Clutches
• Magnetic bearings
• MRI
• Sensors

What is AC Magnetic Analysis? And what is used for?

AC, or alternating current, Magnetic, is the study of magnetic fields due to alternating, or time harmonic, currents. Similar to Magnetostatic, Maxwell's displacement current that couples the electric and magnetic fields is assumed to be null.

In EMS/AC Magnetic analysis, the Gauss's law for magnetism, i.e. divergence of magnetic flux density is null, and Faraday's law,, i.e. the induced electromotive force (emf) in any closed circuit is equal to the time rate of change of the magnetic flux through the circuit, are invoked to compute the magnetic field and its related quantities due to alternating electric currents and voltages. It has many practical applications, including:

• AC Motors and generators
• Sensors
• Coils and transformers
• Inverters
• Converters
• Bus bars
• Inductors
• NDT and NDE
• Inductive heating and hardening
• Eddy current meters
• Induction motors
• Eddy current brakes

What is Transient Magnetic Analysis? And what is used for?

Transient Magnetic, is the study of magnetic fields due to time varying currents, typically caused by surges in currents. Similar to Magnetostatic and AC Magnetic, Maxwell's displacement current that couples the electric and magnetic fields is assumed to be null.

In EMS/ Transient Magnetic analysis, the Gauss's law for magnetism, i.e. divergence of magnetic flux density is null, and Faraday's law,, i.e. the induced electromotive force (emf) in any closed circuit is equal to the time rate of change of the magnetic flux through the circuit, are invoked to compute the magnetic field and its related quantities due to permanent magnets and time varying electric currents and voltages. It has many practical applications, including:

• Switch on/off modes and failures in power electronic devices
• Saturation in steel cores
• NDT and NDE
• Inductive heating and hardening
• Induction machines
• Levitators
• Motors and generators
• Actuators
• Loud speakers
• Alternators

What is S-parameters Analysis? And what is used for?

Scattering parameters or S-parameters (the elements of a scattering matrix or S-matrix) describe the electrical behaviours of linear electrical networks when undergoing various steady state stimuli by electrical signals. Although applicable at any frequency, S-parameters are mostly used for networks operating at radio frequency and microwave frequencies where signal power and energy considerations are more easily quantified than currents and voltages. S-parameters change with the frequency are readily represented in matrix form and obey the rules of matrix algebra.

The HFWorks/S-parameters analysis belongs to the high frequency electromagnetic, or the full wave, regime, i.e. Maxwell's displacement current that couples the electric and magnetic fields is significant and thus taken into consideration. The vector wave equation, i.e. combination of the full Maxwell's equations, is solved using vector finite element to obtain the S-parameters and the electric/magnetic fields and related design parameters. It has many practical applications, including:

• Connectors
• Filters
• Couplers
• Attenuators
• Terminators
• Baluns
• Integrated Circuit
• Waveguides
• Power dividers
• Multiplexers
• Power combiners
• Transitions

What is Resonance Analysis? And what is used for?

Resonance is the tendency of a system to oscillate with larger amplitude at some frequencies than at others. These are known as the system's resonant frequencies. At these frequencies, even small periodic driving forces can produce large amplitude oscillations, because the system stores energy. When loss is small, the resonant frequency is approximately equal to a natural frequency of the system, which is a frequency of unforced vibrations. Some systems have multiple, distinct, resonant frequencies. Resonance phenomena occur with all types of waves: there is mechanical resonance, acoustic resonance, electromagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance and resonance of quantum wave functions.

In HFWorks/Resonance analysis, we are concerned only with electromagnetic resonance. The vector wave equation, i.e. combination of the full Maxwell's equations, is solved using vector finite element to obtain the natural resonant frequencies and their corresponding electric/magnetic field distributions. It has many practical applications, including:

• Dielectric resonators
• Filters
• Resonators
• Microwave Circuits
• Microwave Ovens
• Food and industrial heating
• Wood drying and processing
• Resonator antennas
• High Q structures
• Linear accelerators

What is Antenna Analysis? And what is used for?

An antenna is a transducer that transmits or receives electromagnetic waves. In other words, antennas convert electromagnetic radiation into electric current, or vice versa. Antennas generally deal in the transmission and reception of radio waves, and are a necessary part of all radio equipment. Antennas are used in systems such as radio and television broadcasting, point-to-point radio communication, wireless LAN, cell phones, radar, and spacecraft communication.

Using HFWorks/Antenna analysis, antennas of all types and shapes can readily be simulated. The vector wave equation is solved using vector finite element to obtain the near/far antenna fields and all related antenna parameters such as gain, directivity, efficiency, pattern, etc. All sort of antennas can be studied, including:

• Wire
• Printed
• Horn
• Aperture
• Arrays
• Radomes
• Log-periodic
• Reflector
• Yagi
• Patch
• Parabolic

What is EMS anyway?

EMS is an acronym to ElectroMagnetic Simulation. It is a 3D electromagnetic field simulator software suite, based on the powerful finite element method. Currently, it is the only electromagnetic Add-in to SolidWorks®, the #1 CAD package. EMS is Gold Certified by SolidWorks® and targets four main areas: electromechanical, electromagnetic, power electronics, and electromagnetic behaviour. Each of its five modules: Electrostatic, Conduction, Magnetostatic, AC-Magnetic, and Transient, has a built-in fully integrated thermal solver. EMS empowers the designer to compute electric, magnetic, mechanical, and thermal parameters including, force, torque, magnetic flux density, magnetic field, electric field, electric flux, current flow, eddy current, inductance, capacitance, resistance, flux linkage, core loss, saturation, induced voltage, force density, power loss, temperature, temperature gradient, heat flux and more

What is HFWorks anyway?

HFWorks stands for High Frequency Works. It is a fully 3-Dimensional field simulator for RF/Microwave and Wireless applications, based on the powerful finite element method. Currently, it is the only high frequency electromagnetic Add-in to SolidWorks®, the #1 CAD package. HFWorks is Gold Certified by SolidWorks® Corporation and includes three main solvers: Antennas, S-parameters, and Resonance. It covers a wide range of applications such as dielectric resonators, high Q filters, oscillators, tuning elements, matching circuits, waveguide twists and bends, waveguide tees, directional couplers, isolators, circulators, attenuators, antennas and feeds, accelerators, connectors, IC packages, RF coils, EMI emissions, EMC coupling, RF MEMS, chip-package-boards, PCBs, etc. HFWorks empowers you to gain physical insight into the performance of your design through the computation of important parameters such as resonance frequency, dielectric and conductor quality factors, scattering matrix, antenna pattern, antenna gain and directivity, impedance, admittance, VSWR, propagation parameters, field eigenvalues, far fields, electric and magnetic fields, SAR, etc. Whether you design circuit components or antennas, whether you use planar circuit technologies, standard waveguides or dielectric guides, whether you are interested in frequency responses of antennas and circuits, resonance behaviour, EMI or EMC, HFWorks covers your needs.

What is ATLASS? And what can I do with it?

ATLASS is an acronym to Advanced Transmission Line Analysis and Synthesis System. It is an affordable tool for all your transmission line calculation and RF/microwave design support needs. ATLASS is loaded with unique feature that make working with transmission lines or carrying out common microwave calculations very easy!

With over 70 different transmission line and guiding structures grouped in 8 families, ATLASS offers one of the most comprehensive libraries of its kind. In addition, ATLASS comes with a full library of predefined materials and conductors.

Analysis/Synthesis pages allows you to go from physical to electrical parameters or vice versa quickly and easily. Get a complete set of transmission line parameters including primary transmission liner parameters. ATLASS also gives you full control over the synthesis process.

The Sweep page enables you to get real insight into the behaviour of your guiding structure as any of its parameters, i.e., dimensions, frequency or material properties, are swept of a range of values. See these results in graphical format and understand how your design might be sensitive to tolerances and process variations.

The Seamless Finite Element Analysis, for any of ATLASS's over 70 guiding structures, you may carry out fullwave 2D filed analysis for multiple modes automatically and very quickly. Gain insight into mode distributions and transmission line properties without ever worrying about drawing, meshing, boundary conditions, etc.

The SmithChart & Tools pages give you a handy SmithChart calculations, conversions, wave calculations and commonly used physical constants are all standard parts of ATLASS.

Is ATLASS a high or low frequency product?

Both. However, most of the structures in ATLASS are commonly used in high frequency applications.